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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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image: Signaling Resistance

Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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image: Tracking Miracles

Tracking Miracles

By | April 1, 2015

A panel of oncologists discusses cases of exceptional responders, or cancer patients whose tumors disappear after a brief period of chemotherapy.

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image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

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image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

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image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

4 Comments

image: Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

Engineered Biomarkers Could ID Cancer Cells

By | February 23, 2015

Scientists develop synthetic blood-based biomarkers to amplify tumor signals in a mouse model.

2 Comments

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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