Advertisement
TECA Corporation
TECA Corporation

The Scientist

» sexual orientation, ecology and microbiology

Most Recent

image: “Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

“Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

By | July 15, 2014

Linking a mold identified in a sample of recalled yogurt to consumer-reported illnesses may be premature, scientists say.

0 Comments

image: Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

By | July 10, 2014

The effects of neonicotinoid use on insect populations appear to be rippling through the food chain, scientists show.

1 Comment

image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

0 Comments

image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2014 issue of The Scientist

0 Comments

image: Going Beyond the Lab

Going Beyond the Lab

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists who study the biological roots of sexual orientation should continue working with educators, policy-makers, and the public to put their data to good use.

10 Comments

image: Searching for Gay Genes

Searching for Gay Genes

By | July 1, 2014

Watch NIH researcher and Critic at Large Dean Hamer describe the nuances of his research into the genetics of sexual orientation.

0 Comments

image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

0 Comments

image: To Study Unfettered

To Study Unfettered

By | July 1, 2014

Researching the causes of sexual orientation should be guided by scientific, not social, concerns.

5 Comments

image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  2. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist