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image: Sweet and Low

Sweet and Low

By | October 1, 2015

Glucose activates sleep-promoting neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

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image: The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

By | October 1, 2015

Camillo Golgi’s black reaction revealed, for the first time, the fine structures of intact neurons, which he captured with ink and paper.

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image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: Chemical Cocktails Produce Neurons

Chemical Cocktails Produce Neurons

By | August 6, 2015

Two research groups have devised small-molecule recipes to directly transform fibroblasts into neurons.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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