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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

Source of Scales, Feathers, Hair

By | June 27, 2016

Reptiles, birds, and mammals all produce tiny, bump-like structures during development.   

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image: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

By | June 23, 2016

Using a new approach to analyze the transcriptomes of thousands of individual cell nuclei in postmortem brains, researchers identify multiple neuronal subtypes.

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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 17, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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