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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gene Drives and Other Controversies

Gene Drives and Other Controversies

By | January 1, 2017

Aedes and Anopheles control; three-parent babies; the PhD glut

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image: Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

By | January 1, 2017

The University of Alabama, Birmingham, researcher seeks the neural roots of animal behavior

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image: Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

Introducing genetic changes into mosquito populations could be key to effective malaria control.

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image: Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

For years, researchers have looked to genetically modify mosquitoes to prevent the spread of malaria. Now they have a promising strategy.

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image: UN Rejects Calls for Moratorium on Gene Drive Research

UN Rejects Calls for Moratorium on Gene Drive Research

By | December 23, 2016

Activists claim the technology is too risky, but scientists advise the United Nations to continue to support gene drive research.

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image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

By | December 20, 2016

Reductions in the volume of gray matter in specific regions appear to represent synaptic pruning, a new study suggests, that tunes a mother’s brain to childcare.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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