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Death Match

By | October 1, 2012

Cockfighting and other cultural practices in Southeast Asia could greatly aid the spread of deadly diseases like bird flu.

1 Comment

image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

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Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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Live-Action Networks

By | October 1, 2012

Mass spec plus novel software equals dynamic views into the chemical lives of microbes.

0 Comments

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Obama's Science Report Card

Obama's Science Report Card

By | October 1, 2012

A look at what the President achieved during his first term in the areas of health, space science, energy, environment, and science education

15 Comments

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Science and Democracy

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers and conscientious citizens must unite against the partisan rancor in American politics and restore the role of scientific information in policymaking.

1 Comment

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Speaking of Science

By | October 1, 2012

October 2012's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

By | September 28, 2012

The microbiome of the lung is different in patients with the disease, which causes a thick buildup of mucus that makes breathing difficult.

2 Comments

image: Evolving Dependence

Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

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