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Charles Darwin for Congress

By | November 13, 2012

Nominated as a write-in candidate as a protest against the anti-science incumbent, famed naturalist Charles Darwin won 4,000 congressional votes in a Georgia county.

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image: Science and the 2012 Election

Science and the 2012 Election

By | November 8, 2012

From education to space, science fared well at the polls on Tuesday.

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image: Industry Donates Big This Election

Industry Donates Big This Election

By | November 6, 2012

Biotech, pharmaceutical, and insurance companies have spent a record-breaking amount this election—nearly $200 million.

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image: The Biology of Politics

The Biology of Politics

By | November 6, 2012

A number of studies have linked genes and hormones to political attitudes and behaviors, though the evidence remains controversial.

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image: NYC’s Bloomberg Endorses Obama

NYC’s Bloomberg Endorses Obama

By | November 6, 2012

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announces his support for President Barack Obama's reelection, citing concern over climate change.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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