The Scientist

» women in science and ecology

Most Recent

image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

6 Comments

image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

0 Comments

From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

5 Comments

Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

1 Comment

image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

0 Comments

image: Trump Signals Support for Women in STEM

Trump Signals Support for Women in STEM

By | March 2, 2017

The president has signed two bills encouraging NASA and the NSF to recruit women into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics professions. 

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

2 Comments

image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

0 Comments

Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. GM Mosquitoes Closer to Release in U.S.
  2. Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-Hub
  3. Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math
  4. Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?
RayBiotech