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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

2 Comments

image: Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells

Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells

By | May 21, 2015

A deep-sequencing analysis reveals that non-malignant skin cells harbor many more cancer-driving mutations than previously expected. 

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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