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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

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image: Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells

Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells

By | May 21, 2015

A deep-sequencing analysis reveals that non-malignant skin cells harbor many more cancer-driving mutations than previously expected. 

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

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