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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

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image: Freezing Cells

Freezing Cells

By | February 1, 2013

A handful of species have learned how to survive in freezing climates. To do so, the animals must counteract the damaging effects of ice crystal formation, or keep from freezing altogether. Here are a few ways they do it.

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image: Frogcicle

Frogcicle

By | February 1, 2013

Watch as the astounding wood frog uses cellular cryopreservation tricks to freeze, thaw, and live to croak about it.

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image: Icing Organs

Icing Organs

By | February 1, 2013

Why scientists are so near and yet so far from being able to cryopreserve organs

6 Comments

image: Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

By | January 31, 2013

Pro athletes can learn to parse a complicated moving visual scene faster than most.

2 Comments

image: The Sound of Salt

The Sound of Salt

By | January 30, 2013

A putative ion channel integral to mammalian hearing turns out to be an elusive salt-sensing chemoreceptor in nematode worms.

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image: Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

By | January 28, 2013

A University of Wisconsin neuroscientist is found guilty of falsifying Western blots as part of his stroke research, and has requested the retraction of two papers.

1 Comment

image: The Making of a Bully

The Making of a Bully

By | January 25, 2013

Adolescent rats exposed to stress grow into pathologically aggressive adults, behaviors that may be explained by accompanying epigenetic changes and altered brain activity.

5 Comments

image: Misconduct Apology

Misconduct Apology

By | January 18, 2013

A neurodegenerative disease researcher found guilty of fabricating results in funding applications has written an open letter of apology and clarification.

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