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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

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image: Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

By | April 1, 2017

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

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