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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease Shows Promise

Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease Shows Promise

By | August 31, 2016

Biogen’s aducanumab reduces amyloid-β plaques in a dose-dependent manner, according to interim results of a Phase 1b clinical trial.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: Toward an Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

Toward an Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

By | July 28, 2016

Targeting tau antibodies does not require effector function, researchers report.

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image: CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

By | July 25, 2016

Researchers in China will use the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit T cells extracted from patients with cancer before those cells are returned to the body to target malignant ones.

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