The Scientist

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: HIV Antibody Therapy

HIV Antibody Therapy

By | April 8, 2015

Delivering antibodies to HIV-infected people can lower levels of the virus, a study shows.

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image: Another CAR-T IPO

Another CAR-T IPO

By | April 6, 2015

Cellectis goes public for a whopping $228 million—nearly double the value the company filed for in February.

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image: Personalized Cancer Vaccines

Personalized Cancer Vaccines

By | April 2, 2015

A dendritic cell vaccine targeting melanoma patients’ tumor-specific mutations can activate a broad range of cancer-fighting T cells. 

2 Comments

image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The CAR T-Cell Race

The CAR T-Cell Race

By | April 1, 2015

Tumor-targeting T-cell therapies are generating remarkable remissions in hard-to-beat cancers—and attracting millions of dollars of investment along the way.

2 Comments

image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

5 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Making Cancer Vaccines Work

Opinion: Making Cancer Vaccines Work

By | March 31, 2015

Armed with the right adjuvant system, vaccines are poised to tackle one of the world’s most intractable diseases. 

4 Comments

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