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image: Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

By | April 20, 2016

Contamination concerns at cell therapy and radioactive tracer facilities spur production shutdowns.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

By | April 1, 2016

Now hailed as the father of immunotherapy, William Coley pioneered extraordinary methods to treat cancer.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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image: Cancer Be Damned

Cancer Be Damned

By | April 1, 2016

Teenager Lauren Bendesky turned her cancer diagnosis on its head, using herself as a research subject to test potential therapies.

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image: TS Picks: March 16, 2016

TS Picks: March 16, 2016

By | March 16, 2016

Corrections give belated credit for immunotherapy; mosquitoes have been bugging us long before Zika; the bright side of irreproducibility 

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