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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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Cancer Be Damned

By | April 1, 2016

Teenager Lauren Bendesky turned her cancer diagnosis on its head, using herself as a research subject to test potential therapies.

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image: TS Picks: March 16, 2016

TS Picks: March 16, 2016

By | March 16, 2016

Corrections give belated credit for immunotherapy; mosquitoes have been bugging us long before Zika; the bright side of irreproducibility 

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MYC Helps Cancer Hide

By | March 10, 2016

The transcriptional regulator dampens the immune system’s ability to elicit an antitumor response, a study shows.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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