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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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An early-stage study of the effectiveness of a lung-cancer vaccine developed by scientists in Cuba could start as early as next month.

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image: Cuban-U.S. Research Collaborations Easier Now

Cuban-U.S. Research Collaborations Easier Now

By | October 18, 2016

President Obama’s executive actions remove some of the red tape for American and Cuban scientists to work together.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

By | October 11, 2016

Dale Schenk, who worked to develop a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease, has passed away at age 59.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease Shows Promise

Immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease Shows Promise

By | August 31, 2016

Biogen’s aducanumab reduces amyloid-β plaques in a dose-dependent manner, according to interim results of a Phase 1b clinical trial.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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