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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

By | September 8, 2014

The US Food and Drug Administration last week approved the first of a new type of immunotherapy that aims to pit a patient’s own immune system against her cancer.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Week in Review: June 23–27

Week in Review: June 23–27

By | June 27, 2014

Tracking chikungunya virus; reconsidering wood decay-based fungal classification; ASC specks spread inflammation; antibiotic tolerance in E. coli; RIKEN review yields corrections

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image: Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

By | June 25, 2014

Scientists come up with a simpler, more efficient strategy for making multivirus-targeting T cells for immunotherapy.

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image: Targeted Brain Cancer Vaccine

Targeted Brain Cancer Vaccine

By | June 25, 2014

Mouse study demonstrates the ability of a cancer vaccine targeted against a specific oncogenic mutation to elicit a protective anti-tumor immune response. 

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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