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image: Tactical Maneuvers

Tactical Maneuvers

By | June 1, 2014

Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

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image: Targeting Tumors with Viruses

Targeting Tumors with Viruses

By | June 1, 2014

Stephanie Swift discusses the strategy of fighting cancer with viruses.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

1 Comment

image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

3 Comments

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