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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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image: Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

By | April 20, 2016

Contamination concerns at cell therapy and radioactive tracer facilities spur production shutdowns.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

By | April 1, 2016

Now hailed as the father of immunotherapy, William Coley pioneered extraordinary methods to treat cancer.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2016

April 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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