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image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

By | March 13, 2017

Researchers in Australia claim to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat devil facial tumor disease.

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image: Kite’s CAR T-Cell Therapy Success

Kite’s CAR T-Cell Therapy Success

By | March 1, 2017

More than one-third of lymphoma patients in a Phase 2 trial were clear of disease at six months, and no new safety concerns arose since the company’s three-month follow up.

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image: HIV Vaccines May Help Tamp Down Virus

HIV Vaccines May Help Tamp Down Virus

By | February 24, 2017

A fraction of HIV patients in a small, uncontrolled study were able to stop antiretroviral therapy after receiving the immune boosters.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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