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image: Cancer Be Damned

Cancer Be Damned

By | April 1, 2016

Teenager Lauren Bendesky turned her cancer diagnosis on its head, using herself as a research subject to test potential therapies.

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image: TS Picks: March 16, 2016

TS Picks: March 16, 2016

By | March 16, 2016

Corrections give belated credit for immunotherapy; mosquitoes have been bugging us long before Zika; the bright side of irreproducibility 

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image: MYC Helps Cancer Hide

MYC Helps Cancer Hide

By | March 10, 2016

The transcriptional regulator dampens the immune system’s ability to elicit an antitumor response, a study shows.

1 Comment

A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

Single Antibody Protects Macaques from Ebola

By | February 25, 2016

The “just right” binding properties of a monoclonal antibody from an Ebolavirus survivor help it neutralize the virus.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

1 Comment

image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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