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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: A Walk on the Wild Side

A Walk on the Wild Side

By | February 1, 2017

Plants have so much to teach us.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Opinion: Ethical Considerations of “Three-Parent” Babies

Opinion: Ethical Considerations of “Three-Parent” Babies

By | December 22, 2016

Mitochondrial replacement therapy raises important societal and ethical concerns, but should be embraced for its utility in preventing disease.

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Redesigning Life</em>

Book Excerpt from Redesigning Life

By | December 1, 2016

In Chapter 8, author John Parrington explores the intersection of precision genome editing and stem cell technologies.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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