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Examining the tragedies of several families who each lost multiple children, two teams of researchers reveal a previously unappreciated role for a mitochondrial enzyme.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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Researchers identify a C. elegans gene that leads the organelles to self-destruct in sperm following fertilization of an egg.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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The US Senate is reviewing a bill that would extend a ban on so-called three-parent embryos.

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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