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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: “Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

“Yeti” Just a Himalayan Bear?

By | March 17, 2015

Latest analysis suggests the yeti is a known bear species, not the new, hybrid species suggested by a previous study.

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image: Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria

By | March 12, 2015

From plants to mice and human cells, tetracyclines lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms.

9 Comments

image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

2 Comments

image: UK Supports Three-Parent IVF

UK Supports Three-Parent IVF

By | February 3, 2015

Parliament today voted to allow techniques that could help couples produce babies with a reduced chance of passing on heritable mitochondrial diseases.

1 Comment

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

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