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» mitochondria and developmental biology

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image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

2 Comments

image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Why Women Outlive Men

Why Women Outlive Men

By | August 3, 2012

Mitochondria mutations that affect male, but not female, aging could explain why women tend to live longer than men.

6 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Munching Macrophages

Munching Macrophages

By | July 1, 2012

Making macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques digest spent organelles instead of dying may help keep plaques stable.

1 Comment

image: Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

By | June 13, 2012

A United Kingdom ethics council approves altering human egg cells, which could allow doctors to correct mitochondrial disease in IVF patients.

2 Comments

image: Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

By | June 7, 2012

Contrary to existing dogma, colon cancer cell mitochondria carry fewer mutations than mitochondria of normal body cells.

1 Comment

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

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