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image: UK May Allow Mitochondrial Replacement

UK May Allow Mitochondrial Replacement

By | March 21, 2013

The country’s fertility regulator reported that the technique has “broad support.”

3 Comments

image: Giant Squid Are a Single Species

Giant Squid Are a Single Species

By | March 20, 2013

Arciteuthis from disparate locations around the world are genetically similar.

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image: Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

By | February 15, 2013

Disruptions in the interaction between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can lead to deficiencies in the mitochondrial energy-generating process, affecting fitness.

3 Comments

image: Why Women Outlive Men

Why Women Outlive Men

By | August 3, 2012

Mitochondria mutations that affect male, but not female, aging could explain why women tend to live longer than men.

6 Comments

image: Munching Macrophages

Munching Macrophages

By | July 1, 2012

Making macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques digest spent organelles instead of dying may help keep plaques stable.

1 Comment

image: Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

Manipulating Eggs to Avoid Disease

By | June 13, 2012

A United Kingdom ethics council approves altering human egg cells, which could allow doctors to correct mitochondrial disease in IVF patients.

2 Comments

image: Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

Fewer Mutations in Tumor Mitochondria

By | June 7, 2012

Contrary to existing dogma, colon cancer cell mitochondria carry fewer mutations than mitochondria of normal body cells.

1 Comment

image: Ginormous Genome

Ginormous Genome

By | May 1, 2012

Researchers find organisms with huge genomes with high mutation rates, overturning a common expectation in evolutionary biology.

8 Comments

image: Give Me a Hug

Give Me a Hug

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in cell biology

0 Comments

image: The Enigmatic Membrane

The Enigmatic Membrane

By | February 1, 2012

Despite years of research, the longstanding mystery of where the autophagosome gets its double lipid bilayers is not much clearer.

6 Comments

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