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image: Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

By | April 29, 2016

The reprogrammed germ-like cells were unable to fertilize eggs, however. 

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image: Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

Next Generation: Sperm-Catching Beads

By | April 27, 2016

Sperm-binding, peptide–coated beads work as an implantable contraception device in mice and as a means of selecting human sperm for assisted reproduction techniques, researchers show. 

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

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image: Toward Making Sperm in the Lab

Toward Making Sperm in the Lab

By | February 25, 2016

Researchers devise a technique for creating gametes from murine embryonic stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

By | January 28, 2016

Increasing the expression of two genes from non-Y chromosomes restores spermatogenesis in male mice that lack Y chromosomes.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

By | December 3, 2015

Moderately obese men display different epigenetic marks on their sperm than lean men, and bariatric surgery in massively obese men correlated with changes in sperm methylation.

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