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image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

By | December 30, 2015

Several studies using centuries-old genetic material graced the pages of life-science journals in 2015. Here’s a look at a few of the researchers and papers that made headlines this year.

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Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

Farming Sped Eurasian Evolution

By | November 24, 2015

New clues from ancient DNA reveal the remarkable effect of agriculture on adaptation in Stone Age humans who lived across Europe.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

Denisovan DNA Reveals Human Roots

By | November 19, 2015

The ancient genomes of 50,000-year-old Denisovan teeth suggest the extinct species lived alongside Neanderthals and modern humans.

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image: Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

Incan Mummy Genome Sequenced

By | November 16, 2015

Researchers decode mitochondrial DNA from the 500-year-old remains of a native South American child, revealing a new line of maternal ancestors.

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Life Scientists Honored

By | November 9, 2015

Breakthrough Prizes of $3 million each go to five researchers in the life sciences, recognizing their pioneering work in optogenetics, disease-associated mutation analyses, and ancient DNA sequencing.

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