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» ancient DNA and developmental biology

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Week in Review: December 16–20

Week in Review: December 16–20

By | December 20, 2013

Sex lives of early hominins; Amborella trichopoda genome; surface topography and stem cells; how HIV weakens immune cells; dogs, dust microbes, and mouse allergies; news from ASCB

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image: Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

By | December 4, 2013

A 400,000-year-old mitochondrial genome adds new twists to scientists’ picture of early human evolution.

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image: Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

By | November 18, 2013

In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  

2 Comments

image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

5 Comments

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: European Roots for Native Americans?

European Roots for Native Americans?

By | October 29, 2013

An analysis of ancient DNA from a 24,000-year-old Siberian skeleton generates a new model for the original peopling of the Western Hemisphere.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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