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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Ancient Beasts Classified by Collagen

Ancient Beasts Classified by Collagen

By | March 19, 2015

Protein extracted from ancient fossils identified by Darwin as some of the “strangest animals ever discovered” places the creatures amongst horses, tapirs, and rhinos on the tree of life.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 12, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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