The Scientist

» ancient DNA and ecology

Most Recent

image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

0 Comments

image: Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

By | March 14, 2016

Nuclear DNA from 430,000-year-old specimens indicates that Neanderthals had already diverged from their ancient-human predecessors.

0 Comments

A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

0 Comments

image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

0 Comments

image: Ancient Microbe Migration

Ancient Microbe Migration

By | January 11, 2016

Bacteria from the stomach contents of “Iceman,” an ancient corpse frozen in a European glacier, shed light on early human migration.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

0 Comments

image: Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

By | December 30, 2015

Several studies using centuries-old genetic material graced the pages of life-science journals in 2015. Here’s a look at a few of the researchers and papers that made headlines this year.

1 Comment

image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS