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The Scientist

» ancient DNA and evolution

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Seal Stowaways

Seal Stowaways

By | November 1, 2014

Pathogen traces recovered from Peruvian mummies suggest tuberculosis-causing bacteria rode from Africa to South America in pinnipeds.

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Ancient Plant Virus Found in Caribou Poop

Ancient Plant Virus Found in Caribou Poop

By | October 29, 2014

Researchers resurrect a virus from 700-year-old frozen feces found in northern Canada.

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image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

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image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

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image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

3 Comments

image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

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image: Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

By | October 2, 2014

Simple changes help yeast thrive in the presence of their own harmful byproducts and could boost biofuel production.

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