Advertisement
RayBiotech
RayBiotech

The Scientist

» ancient DNA

Most Recent

image: Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

Oldest Hominin DNA Ever Sequenced

By | December 4, 2013

A 400,000-year-old mitochondrial genome adds new twists to scientists’ picture of early human evolution.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

By | November 18, 2013

In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  

2 Comments

image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

5 Comments

image: European Roots for Native Americans?

European Roots for Native Americans?

By | October 29, 2013

An analysis of ancient DNA from a 24,000-year-old Siberian skeleton generates a new model for the original peopling of the Western Hemisphere.

0 Comments

image: Sequencing Mummies

Sequencing Mummies

By | August 1, 2013

Peek inside the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Italy, where researchers are unravelling the DNA of centuries-old mummies.

0 Comments

image: The Mummy Code

The Mummy Code

By | August 1, 2013

Ancient-DNA researchers have long clashed over work on Egyptian mummies, but next-gen sequencing might resolve their debates.

3 Comments

image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Mammoth Blood Gives Hope for Cloning?

Mammoth Blood Gives Hope for Cloning?

By | June 3, 2013

Some question the supposition that viable cells and DNA will be found in a remarkably preserved carcass, purported to harbor fresh muscle tissue and flowing blood.

0 Comments

image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

1 Comment

image: The Spoils of War

The Spoils of War

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers read the marks of intense warfare and conquest in the genes of ancient native North Americans.

4 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
Mettler Toledo
BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences