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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes

Neural Connectome Method Uses mRNA Barcodes

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers swap microscopy for RNA sequencing to track neural paths in the mouse brain.  

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

Genetic Tags Illuminate Where Neurons Extend

By | November 1, 2016

Barcodes of mRNA travel to the cells' axon terminals, offering a sequencing-based approach to neural mapping.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: How to Track Translation in Living Cells

How to Track Translation in Living Cells

By | October 1, 2016

Four independent research groups develop techniques for visualizing peptide production in living cells.

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