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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Microbe Maven

Microbe Maven

By | July 17, 2017

Meet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans.

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image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

By | July 17, 2017

The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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