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image: Film Stars

Film Stars

By | June 1, 2014

Engineered bacteria can shape electricity-conducting nanowires.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: The Promise of Nanomedicine

The Promise of Nanomedicine

By | April 8, 2014

At AACR, scientists discuss the growing interest in nanotechnology and how it can be used to study, diagnose, and treat cancer.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

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image: Week in Review: March 24–28

Week in Review: March 24–28

By | March 28, 2014

Synthetic yeast chromosome; human enhancers and promoters mapped; brain-wide map links fly behaviors to neurons; treating eye diseases with nanotechnology

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image: Smarter Contacts, No More Needles

Smarter Contacts, No More Needles

By | March 26, 2014

Nanotechnology could transform the way clinicians treat eye diseases.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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