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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.


image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes


image: Week in Review: March 24–28

Week in Review: March 24–28

By | March 28, 2014

Synthetic yeast chromosome; human enhancers and promoters mapped; brain-wide map links fly behaviors to neurons; treating eye diseases with nanotechnology


image: Smarter Contacts, No More Needles

Smarter Contacts, No More Needles

By | March 26, 2014

Nanotechnology could transform the way clinicians treat eye diseases.


image: Week in Review: March 17–21

Week in Review: March 17–21

By | March 21, 2014

Protein appears to protect stressed neurons; vitamin A’s lifelong effects on immunity; stem cells influenced by substrates; supercharged photosynthesis through nanotechnology


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 12, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research


image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes


image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

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image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.


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