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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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image: Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

By | July 17, 2017

The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.

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image: Image of the Day: Tied Up

Image of the Day: Tied Up

By | January 13, 2017

Scientists created the world’s tiniest molecular knot, only 192 atoms in length, using iron ions to guide the braiding process.

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image: Molecular Machinists Win Nobel

Molecular Machinists Win Nobel

By | October 5, 2016

Chemists Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard Feringa are honored for their design and synthesis of molecular machines.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Copper Stopper

Copper Stopper

By | May 1, 2016

This research found that coating hospital surfaces with copper helped battle microbes and the infections they spread.

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image: Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

By | May 1, 2016

Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 

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image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

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image: BIOMOD

BIOMOD

By | July 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Shawn Douglas explains the annual competition he established to introduce students to molecular programming.

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