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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

By | October 1, 2015

The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.

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image: Special Delivery

Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old

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image: Whistle Stop

Whistle Stop

By | October 1, 2015

Visit the remote Turkish village where the musical language that residents use to communicate across valleys is elucidating how language is processed in the brain.

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image: Whistle While You Work Your Brain

Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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