The Scientist

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image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.


image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

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image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.


image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  


image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.


image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes


image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside


image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.


image: Contributors


By | May 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2013 issue of The Scientist.


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