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image: A Whiff of TB

A Whiff of TB

By | March 1, 2012

Chemical ecologist Max Suckling at the Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd., and summer student Rachael Sagar use Pavlovian conditioning to train bees to stick out their tongues, or proboscises, at the scent of odors produced by tuberculosis-causing bacteria.


image: What it Takes to Develop Better Drugs for Kids

What it Takes to Develop Better Drugs for Kids

By | March 1, 2012

Over the past 15 years, new laws and regulations in the United States and the European Union have expanded to require the inclusion of pediatric patients in clinical drug trials.  



March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Are the Kids Alright?

Are the Kids Alright?

By | March 1, 2012

Two key pieces of legislation, enacted to spur drugmakers into testing pharmaceutical products in children, are up for reauthorization in the US Congress this October. Have they done their jobs?


In Chapter 8, "The Conspiratorial Move and the Struggle for Evidence-Based Medicine," author Nicoli Natrass explores the Internet's role in the rise of anti-science sentiment.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2012

The Wandering Gene and the Indian Princess, The Forever Fix, Connectome, and DNA USA


image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2012

March 2012's selection of notable quotes


image: Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

Suspected Effects of Vitamin D

By | March 1, 2012

Vitamin D has a variety of actions in the body. It binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which then binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and activates the expression of numerous genes. 


image: T-Bee


By | March 1, 2012

Two researchers are trying to train bees to sniff out tuberculosis.


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