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» Week in Review and genetics & genomics

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: CRISPR Screen Detects Functional Gene Regulation

CRISPR Screen Detects Functional Gene Regulation

By | April 3, 2017

A CRISPR-Cas9–based method probes the regulatory roles of noncoding DNA sequences.

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image: Cancer Genomes

Cancer Genomes

By | April 1, 2017

April Scientist to Watch Angela Brooks of the University of California, Santa Cruz, discusses her search to find vulnerabilities buried within the genomes of cancer cells.

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image: Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

Angela Brooks: Splicing Specialist

By | April 1, 2017

At the University of California, Santa Cruz, the researcher combs the cancer genome, looking for weaknesses.

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image: Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall

Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall

By | April 1, 2017

A plant breeder succeeds in growing a huge maize plant thanks to a known mutation and a few environmental tricks.

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image: Week in Review: March 27–31

Week in Review: March 27–31

By | March 31, 2017

European Patent Office greenlights CRISPR patent; scientists reconsider a cancer drug target; NIH accepts preprints in grant applications; MERS drug developers test antibodies; experts weigh the risks and benefits of whole-exome sequencing for healthy people

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image: <em>Aedes aegypti</em> Genome Assembled From Scratch

Aedes aegypti Genome Assembled From Scratch

By | March 27, 2017

Scientists use a new technique to piece together the mosquito’s full genome.

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image: Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

By | March 24, 2017

With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

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image: Week in Review: March 20–24

Week in Review: March 20–24

By | March 24, 2017

What proposed budget cuts could mean for NIH; how astrocytes help control circadian behaviors in mice; how mutations confer virulence to vaccine-derived polio; why cancer risk is in part “random”

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Mitochondrial DNA polymerase is necessary for the destruction of paternal mtDNA in fruit fly sperm, scientists show.

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