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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Mother’s Microbiome Shapes Offspring’s Immunity

Mother’s Microbiome Shapes Offspring’s Immunity

By | March 17, 2016

The maternal gut microbiome guides neo- and postnatal immune system development, a mouse study shows. 

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Borrowing Immunity Through Interbreeding

Borrowing Immunity Through Interbreeding

By | January 7, 2016

Neanderthals and Denisovans contributed innate immune genes to modern humans, scientists show.

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image: Neutrophils Lead, T Cells Follow

Neutrophils Lead, T Cells Follow

By | September 3, 2015

When influenza invades the mouse respiratory tract, neutrophils guide the subsequent T-cell attack on infected tissue, scientists show.  

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image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

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image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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