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image: Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

Study: Human Life Span Maxed Out

By | October 6, 2016

Scientists argue that current medical advances cannot crack Homo sapiens’s natural age limit.

1 Comment

image: Spice of Life?

Spice of Life?

By | August 6, 2015

A large prospective study links the consumption of spicy foods to reduced mortality risk.

0 Comments

image: Flipped Fat-burning Linked to Cancer Cachexia

Flipped Fat-burning Linked to Cancer Cachexia

By | July 22, 2014

Conversion of white fat to brown is associated with muscle atrophy and weight loss in cancer patients.

0 Comments

image: For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

For Whom the Biomarkers Toll?

By | February 27, 2014

Study finds that a handful of biological indicators can predict a healthy person’s risk of dying within five years.

1 Comment

image: Killer Cups?

Killer Cups?

By | August 16, 2013

Heavy coffee drinkers under 55 are more likely to die sooner, a study shows.

8 Comments

image: Isolation Harms Health

Isolation Harms Health

By | March 25, 2013

Being socially isolated could increase death risk in the elderly even if they don’t feel lonely.

1 Comment

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