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» acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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image: Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

By | November 6, 2015

One-year-old Layla Richards has remained cancer-free months after receiving an experimental gene editing therapy.

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image: Tumor-Targeting T Cells Engineered

Tumor-Targeting T Cells Engineered

By | August 11, 2013

Scientists genetically modify T cells derived from pluripotent stem cells to attack lymphatic tumors.

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image: Immune System Versus Cancer

Immune System Versus Cancer

By | April 10, 2013

Engineering the immune system to overcome tumor evasion strategies was a hot topic at this week’s AACR meeting, with researchers discussing several new approaches.

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image: Leukemia Linked to Changes in Womb

Leukemia Linked to Changes in Womb

By | April 10, 2013

Genetic changes that may initiate childhood leukemia could originate while the baby is still in utero.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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