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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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image: Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men

Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men

By | June 19, 2017

A deletion in a growth hormone receptor gene is tied to an average of 10 extra years of life among men, but not women, according to a study.

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image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?

Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?

By | June 7, 2017

A study of off-target effects that sparked fear among investors of genome-editing companies receives methodological criticisms.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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