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image: Another Role for ApoE?

Another Role for ApoE?

By | January 20, 2016

Key Alzheimer’s disease–related protein may be a transcriptional regulator.

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image: UCSD Names New Head of Alzheimer’s Study

UCSD Names New Head of Alzheimer’s Study

By | January 18, 2016

The project at the center of the dust up between the University of California, San Diego, and the University of Southern California gets a new leader, as the institutions continue to battle in court.

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Life Scientists Honored

Life Scientists Honored

By | November 9, 2015

Breakthrough Prizes of $3 million each go to five researchers in the life sciences, recognizing their pioneering work in optogenetics, disease-associated mutation analyses, and ancient DNA sequencing.

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