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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

By | December 8, 2014

Blocking activity of a kinase in a mouse model protects Golgi in cells and reduces the build-up of amyloid β, a primary component of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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