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image: Bees Reverse Brain Aging

Bees Reverse Brain Aging

By | July 6, 2012

Older foraging bees experience a change in brain chemistry when they revert to nest duties typically given to younger individuals.

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image: Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

By | June 18, 2012

A protein fragment involved in Alzheimer’s can seed new clusters throughout the brain, pointing to prion-like qualities of the disease.

10 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

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image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: The Two Faces of Metastasis

The Two Faces of Metastasis

By | April 1, 2012

During development, the cells of an embryo change their pattern of gene expression, which allows them to detach from their original location and migrate to another part of the embryo, where the pattern changes again to allow formation of a new organ.

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