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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Metals on our Mind

Metals on our Mind

By | April 1, 2014

A dramatic loss of copper in key brain regions may be central to Alzheimer’s disease. Could restoring metals in the brain help?

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: Week in Review: March 17–21

Week in Review: March 17–21

By | March 21, 2014

Protein appears to protect stressed neurons; vitamin A’s lifelong effects on immunity; stem cells influenced by substrates; supercharged photosynthesis through nanotechnology

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.

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image: Protein Protects Aging Brain

Protein Protects Aging Brain

By | March 19, 2014

Study suggests that REST may be a key regulator of neuronal stress and could play a role in staving off neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

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image: Week in Review: March 10–14

Week in Review: March 10–14

By | March 14, 2014

Whole-genome sequencing in the clinic; blood-based biomarkers predict future cognitive problems; how some pain meds inhibit bacterial growth; ResearchGate launches Open Review

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image: Screen the Healthy?

Screen the Healthy?

By | March 12, 2014

In light of a study that showed blood-based biomarkers could predict future cognitive impairment, researchers discuss statistical analyses and the problem of false positives.

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image: Biomarkers Predict Future Cognitive Impairment

Biomarkers Predict Future Cognitive Impairment

By | March 9, 2014

A blood test can predict whether an asymptomatic older adult will develop cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease within two to three years, a study shows.

5 Comments

image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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