The Scientist

» Alzheimer's Disease, ecology and evolution

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.


image: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

New Hope for Alzheimer’s Blood Test

By | October 19, 2015

Using autoantibodies as biomarkers, researchers could soon identify people at the highest risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases much earlier than existing methods.


image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.


image: Polar Dino Discovered

Polar Dino Discovered

By | September 28, 2015

Researchers working in Alaska, above the Arctic Circle, have unearthed the northernmost species of dinosaur ever found.


image: Tree of Life v1.0

Tree of Life v1.0

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers map 2.3 million species in a single phylogeny. 


image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.


image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Contributors


By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about


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