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» Alzheimer's Disease and ecology

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Legal Battle Between UCSD, USC Continues

Legal Battle Between UCSD, USC Continues

By | August 6, 2015

The University of Southern California countersues the University of California, San Diego, as a pharmaceutical company ends an Alzheimer’s research–related contract with the latter institution.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

By | July 22, 2015

Mental agility in women deteriorates at twice the rate of that in men, according to a study of people with mild cognitive impairment.

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image: Delayed Turnover

Delayed Turnover

By | July 21, 2015

Aggregate-forming amyloid β proteins are replenished more slowly with age, and this may contribute to a person's risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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